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Former Managing Director Anna Lidén and Secretary General Kerstin Grebäck recieve the Right Livelihood Award for The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation.
Former Managing Director Anna Lidén and Secretary General Kerstin Grebäck recieve the Right Livelihood Award for The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation.

Right Livelihood Award

In 2002, The Kvinna till Kvinna Foundation was one of the recipients of the Right Livelihood Award, also known as the ”Alternative Nobel Prize”. The award was a fantastic and very welcome recognition of our work, as well as confirmation that women’s participation in building peace is seen as a prerequisite for sustainable peace.

The Right Livelihood Award is presented annually to people and organisations who strive to find practical solutions to the world’s most pressing problems, such as oppression, armed conflict and environmental destruction. The jury’s motivation stated that Kvinna till Kvinna earned the award for ”its remarkable success in healing the wounds of ethnic hatred and war by helping women, who are often the first victims, to become central actors for reconciliation and the building of peace”.

The Right Livelihood Award is presented on 9 December every year at a formal ceremony in the Swedish Parliament. The 2002 award was shared by Kvinna till Kvinna, the Jeunes Kamenge Youth Centre in Burundi, human rights activist Martin Almada from Paraguay and solar cell researcher Martin Green from Australia. The prize money totalled 2 million SEK.

What is the Right Livelihood Award?

The Right Livelihood Award Foundation was created by Jakob von Uexkull in 1980 to honour efforts for a different and brighter future. Since then more than 70 people and groups from over 40 countries have received the award.

The Right Livelihood Award, also known as the ”Alternative Nobel Prize”, was established as a counterweight to the current Nobel Prize. Jakob von Uexkull felt that the Nobel Prize missed much of the work being carried out that is of great significance for our future, thus ignoring Alfred Nobel’s aim of honouring efforts ”that are of great benefit to the human race”.

Funding comes from the original donation made by Jakob von Uexkull, as well as private donations. Other laureates include the Israeli peace initiative Gush Shalom (2001), The Croatian Anti-War Campaign (1998) and author Astrid Lindgren (1994).

Updated in: 2013-04-25